New Resource Added: The Cocurricular Career Connections Leadership Model

We just added a great new resource over on the EEQ Resources page:

Connecting Bridges: The Cocurricular Career Connections Leadership Model – by Adam Peck and Michael Preston. (NACE Journal, August 2018). The C3 model offers a structure for bridging and integrating a variety of experiences on and off campus, including 1) connecting cocurricular learning to classroom learning, 2) connecting experiential learning to learning in structured leadership development programs, and 3) connecting learning in college to learning throughout one’s career.

Check it out!

Promising Practices for Developing Essential Employability Qualities

In the 2017-18 academic year, The QA Commons partnered with 27 programs from 14 colleges and universities to co-design the Essential Employability Qualities Certification. As a result of our work together, we identified several programmatic and institutional promising practices to support students’ development of these qualities. Below are brief descriptions of these promising practices.

Employability is the ability to find, create and sustain work and learning across lengthening working lives and multiple work settings.

EEQ Development & Assessment

  • Degree programs intentionally designed to develop, address, and assess expected EEQ exit proficiencies so there is assurance that all students will graduate from the program fully prepared.
  • Applied research projects designed to addresses real problems in a partner employer’s organizations.
  • Course-embedded community service projects that allow students to directly apply their learning to real community needs.
  • Specific assignments designed so that students can learn content while also practicing different EEQs (e.g., written proposals, presentations, team-based formats, etc.).
  • Experiential learning pathways that allow students to apply their learning in work-relevant situations at several points throughout a program.
  • Team-based capstone projects situated in workplaces and co-taught with employers.
  • Classes co-taught with employers; employers involved in directly assessing student work.

IMG_3899

Career Development, Planning, and Support

  • Courses intentionally designed to support students in understanding the world of work and its expectations.
  • Career development programming integrated across the curriculum and over time, such as embedded career planning activities in courses.
  • Guest speakers from industries and organizations embedded in courses to engage students in considering industry or organization-specific career possibilities.
  • A cross-campus integrated approach to career preparedness through civic engagement.

IMG_3902

Student Records

  • Enhanced student records that convey students’ EEQ development and outcomes in visually accessible and appealing ways.
  • Competency-based badging practices that communicate students’ abilities in visible, verifiable ways.

IMG_3883

Employer Engagement

  • Employer engagement models that go well beyond a traditional Advisory Board into authentic partnerships, or even “employer-attached” curriculum and pedagogy (where employers serve as co-faculty and assessors of student work).
  • Employers and programs working together to develop and test new approaches, such as badging, developing talent pipelines through partnerships, and work-integrated learning modules.

IMG_3873

Graduate / Alumni Feedback

  • Use of findings from well-designed alumni surveys, which address not only program satisfaction but also graduates’ sense of preparedness for employment, graduate employment outcomes, and feedback for program improvement.
  • Purposeful inclusion of alumni who employ program graduates into advisory boards or other feedback mechanisms.

We’re grateful to our partner programs for their contributions to this work! Read the full EEQ CERT Pilot Finding Report HERE.

New Resource: The Partnership Continuum

We’ve just added a great new resource over on our Resources page: The Partnership Continuum from UIDP.

The UIDP’s Partnership Continuum (2012) is a way of thinking about how academia and industry can interact for mutual benefit, often in ways which contribute to national growth. The publication was developed by a team of professionals from each of these sectors with the goal of demonstrating the myriad of ways universities and companies interact with one another.

New Resource: Merging Work and Learning to Develop the Human Skills that Matter

We just added a few new resources to our Resource Library. This one in particular will be of interest to programs and institutions looking to redesign their curricular approach and partner with employers to better address the Essential Employability Qualities in their educational programs.

Merging

Merging Work and Learning to Develop the Human Skills that Matter – from Pearson and Jobs for the Future.

This report showcases promising practices from the US and UK to suggest a forward looking agenda for education and training, moving from uncertainty to the economic advancement of all learners. Some of the strategies profiled include:

  • competency-based education, which allows learners to show what they know as soon as they know it and move quickly to the next level;
  • employer and industry-led models, which radically lower the opportunity costs of education by providing further training on the job;
  • the latest labor market intelligence tools and techniques, which provide educators with powerful insights into the changing skills marketplace;
  • dynamic and work-based pedagogy, to instill the critical skills needed for the future of work; and
  • new pathways and business models that support access and completion for learners at any point in their career and at virtually any income level.

 

Defining and Delivering on Quality in Higher Education: The EEQ CERT

In early June, The QA Commons concluded the Essential Employability Qualities Certification (EEQ CERT) Pilot, in which we partnered with 27 programs from 14 colleges and universities to co-design a new approach to assuring that graduates are prepared for the 21st century world of work. Key aspects of this initiative include addressing quality as well as equity gaps in learning and preparation:

We know that high-quality credentials beyond high school can transform lives — that they open doors to economic opportunity and social mobility and help individuals flourish in a challenging world. But we also know that not everyone who pursues learning beyond high school actually gets a high-quality experience. Too few even get to the finish line and earn a credential. And some who do, still struggle to find employment and succeed in today’s workplace.

Quality Assurance Commons and the EEQs will help address this gap. They also will help institutions make good on an equally urgent promise of closing equity gaps in access to quality experiences and in post-graduation outcomes. QA Commons pilot efforts and other research show that far too few institutions gather and use enough good data on how well their students learn and how they fare after graduation. Moreover, even when collecting data, far too few institutions disaggregate their data to uncover hidden inequities in access to quality experiences — especially across different racial/ethnic groups.

Read the full article by Debra Humphreys HERE.

We are grateful to Lumina Foundation for its wonderful support of this initiative.

Learning from Life and Work – New Report from New England Board of Higher Education

We’ve added another new Resource: The New England Board of Higher Education Learning for Life & Work Report

On March 19, 2018, the Commission on Higher Education and Employability released its final report, Learning for Life and Work. The report details 19 recommendations, as well as strategies for stakeholders to collaborate to increase the employability of the region’s graduates.

The report’s recommendations are grouped in 6 areas:

  1. Effective Use of Labor Market Data and Intelligence
  2. Targeted Higher Education-Industry Partnerships
  3. Planning, Advising and Career Services
  4. Work-integrated, Cooperative and Internship-based Learning
  5. Digital Competencies
  6. Emerging Credentials and Credentialing System

 

Beyond the Skills Gap: Preparing College Students for Life and Work

BeyondSkillsGap

Beyond the Skills Gap: Preparing College Students for Life and Work just received the Ness Book Award at the 2018 AAC&U conference. I attended the authors’ session at the conference and learned quite a bit about their research and work in Wisconsin, and the connections to the Essential Employability Qualities Certification that we are developing. It was an informative and provocative session, with some critical considerations for higher educational programs seeking to make sure their graduates are prepared not just for their first jobs, but for a lifetime of employability in the changing world of work they will encounter. 

BOOK SUMMARY:

Beyond the Skills Gap: Preparing College Students for Life and Work explores how educators can ensure that graduates are adequately prepared for the future, challenging the argument that sluggish economic growth is due to a higher education system insufficiently attuned to workplace needs, with the solution being more specialized technical training and fewer liberal arts graduates. The book’s authors challenge this conception of the “skills gap,” highlighting instead the value of broader twenty-first-century skills in postsecondary education. In the book, the authors advocate for a system in which employers share responsibility along with the education sector to serve the collective needs of the economy, society, and students. Beyond the Skills Gap emphasizes the critical role of educational practice and design in preparing students for the workforce and ensuring that future employees develop robust technical expertise, cultivate problem-solving and communication skills, transfer abstract knowledge to real-world situations, and foster a lifelong aptitude for self-directed learning.

HERE is a link to the session slides posted by Matt Hora, one of the book’s authors and the key presenter at the session. Take a look at slide #14 about classroom methods. Also, check out the “Six things we need to do” at the end. Many of these actions align to our Draft Criteria for Certification – Version 2.  What do you think? 

Perspectives: Employer Representatives Ideas about the Essential Employability Qualities Certification

While we have been co-designing the Essential Employability Qualities Certification (EEQ CERT) with 27 partner programs from 14 colleges and universities, we have also been gathering feedback from a variety of employer representatives and employers. We have been committed all along to engaging with employer perspectives in the design of our new approach to quality assurance, in part because their voices have traditionally been absent from quality assurance approaches (with the exception of a few professional accreditors), but also because truly bridging the gap between higher education and the workforce requires such kinds of partnerships.

Read our first report with employer representative feedback here:

Employer Engagement & Feedback Report

At the end of the report are links to a variety of resources they recommended, so make sure to check these out as well.

 

Bridging the Gap: Creating a New Approach for Assuring 21st Century Employability Skills

Want to know more about the work of The Quality Assurance Commons and the Essential Employability Qualities Certification?

Here is our just-released Change article Bridging the Gap: Creating a New Approach for Assuring 21st Century Employability Skills, in which we discuss the need for the Essential Employability Qualities Certification that we are developing with 27 programs from 14 institutions.

Let us know what you think in the comments below!

 

Revised draft Criteria for EEQ Certification

Image result for revising

As a result of analyzing the Inventories of Practice and Evidence that all 27 EEQ CERT pilot programs submitted, The QA Commons’ team is happy to publicly release a substantial revision to the draft Criteria for EEQ Certification. This new version — version 2 — will be tested during phase 2 of the pilot co-design process in spring 2018, when programs submit program portfolios of evidence.  Please feel free to a look and offer any comments for consideration in the comments box below: