Upcoming Workshop: Using Student-Led Focus Groups to Gather and Make Sense of Assessment Evidence

“Using Student-Led Focus Groups to Gather and Make Sense of Assessment Evidence”

A workshop sponsored by the Center of Inquiry and the Center for Teaching and Learning at Southern New Hampshire University

The workshop will help assessment leaders, institutional researchers, faculty, staff, and students create and implement student-led focus groups to address institutional assessment questions. This workshop is designed to: (1) Train students to conduct focus groups with their peers and get them ready to train additional students to support their work when they return to campus; and (2) Help institutional teams develop a plan for conducting student focus groups to gather and make sense of assessment evidence.

The workshop will be held at Southern New Hampshire University in Hooksett, New Hampshire on October 6-7, 2018.

Learn more HERE

Register HERE

Teaching Soft Skills in College – A Course for Faculty

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Teaching Soft Skills in College

September 24 – November 9, 2018

With this seven-module online certificate, you will learn how to teach communication, teamwork, critical thinking, and self-motivated learning—four “soft skills” strongly linked to student success. This course will provide college educators and administrators with a strong foundation in the theory, research, and practical applications of these crucial 21st-century skills. You’ll also examine skills frameworks, critiques of these frameworks, instructional design principles, and the science behind each of the four skills.

Course is taught by award-winning author and presenter Matthew Hora.

Learning points

At the conclusion of the course, students will demonstrate:

  • an in-depth and critical understanding of 21st-century skills frameworks
  • a deeper understanding of the research behind teamwork, communication, critical thinking, and self-regulated learning
  • an understanding of how these four skills should be conceptualized and taught in their own disciplines
  • how to incorporate best practices for teaching these skills into their own curriculum and instruction

Learn more and register HERE.

National Symposium on College Internship Research – 9.28.18

The Center for Research on College-Workforce Transitions is hosting a National Symposium on College Internship Research.

Friday September 28th, 9:00am – 6:00pm
Pyle Center Vandeberg Auditorium, 121
UW-Madison Campus

The goals of the inaugural College Internship Symposium are as follows:

  • To convey and discuss the current state of empirical research on college internships.
  • To cultivate a community of scholars, practitioners, and policymakers involved in studying and implementing college internships in order to provide networking and collaborative opportunities.
  • To provide a venue for in-depth discussions regarding critical design, legal, and institutionalization issues related to college internships.
  • To catalyze changes in how colleges, universities, and employers design internships so that they are equitable and high-quality for all students.
  • To put student interests and welfare at the center of debates and policymaking regarding college internships.

Panels at the Symposium will also highlight the voices of students and employers who have recently been involved with internship programs, the value of translational or applied research to make empirical findings actionable and useable, and recommendations for future research, policy, and practice.

Read more and register HERE.

Promising Practices for Developing Essential Employability Qualities

In the 2017-18 academic year, The QA Commons partnered with 27 programs from 14 colleges and universities to co-design the Essential Employability Qualities Certification. As a result of our work together, we identified several programmatic and institutional promising practices to support students’ development of these qualities. Below are brief descriptions of these promising practices.

Employability is the ability to find, create and sustain work and learning across lengthening working lives and multiple work settings.

EEQ Development & Assessment

  • Degree programs intentionally designed to develop, address, and assess expected EEQ exit proficiencies so there is assurance that all students will graduate from the program fully prepared.
  • Applied research projects designed to addresses real problems in a partner employer’s organizations.
  • Course-embedded community service projects that allow students to directly apply their learning to real community needs.
  • Specific assignments designed so that students can learn content while also practicing different EEQs (e.g., written proposals, presentations, team-based formats, etc.).
  • Experiential learning pathways that allow students to apply their learning in work-relevant situations at several points throughout a program.
  • Team-based capstone projects situated in workplaces and co-taught with employers.
  • Classes co-taught with employers; employers involved in directly assessing student work.

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Career Development, Planning, and Support

  • Courses intentionally designed to support students in understanding the world of work and its expectations.
  • Career development programming integrated across the curriculum and over time, such as embedded career planning activities in courses.
  • Guest speakers from industries and organizations embedded in courses to engage students in considering industry or organization-specific career possibilities.
  • A cross-campus integrated approach to career preparedness through civic engagement.

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Student Records

  • Enhanced student records that convey students’ EEQ development and outcomes in visually accessible and appealing ways.
  • Competency-based badging practices that communicate students’ abilities in visible, verifiable ways.

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Employer Engagement

  • Employer engagement models that go well beyond a traditional Advisory Board into authentic partnerships, or even “employer-attached” curriculum and pedagogy (where employers serve as co-faculty and assessors of student work).
  • Employers and programs working together to develop and test new approaches, such as badging, developing talent pipelines through partnerships, and work-integrated learning modules.

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Graduate / Alumni Feedback

  • Use of findings from well-designed alumni surveys, which address not only program satisfaction but also graduates’ sense of preparedness for employment, graduate employment outcomes, and feedback for program improvement.
  • Purposeful inclusion of alumni who employ program graduates into advisory boards or other feedback mechanisms.

We’re grateful to our partner programs for their contributions to this work! Read the full EEQ CERT Pilot Finding Report HERE.

New Resource: The Partnership Continuum

We’ve just added a great new resource over on our Resources page: The Partnership Continuum from UIDP.

The UIDP’s Partnership Continuum (2012) is a way of thinking about how academia and industry can interact for mutual benefit, often in ways which contribute to national growth. The publication was developed by a team of professionals from each of these sectors with the goal of demonstrating the myriad of ways universities and companies interact with one another.

New Approaches to Judging Quality

New Approaches

The QA Commons’ program-level quality assurance approach, the Essential Employability Qualities Certification — or EEQ CERT — was recently featured in this CHEA white paper (see pages 12-13): New Approaches to Judging Quality